The NGW Project Bike. Carburetor rebuild

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WingerDave
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#61

Post by WingerDave »

Hey Octane,

The heat shield does have a roof......... but it's pointing the wrong way. It effectively stops almost any air coming up. Its there to stop the air that comes through the radiator. The only problem with this set up is (IMHO) that the intakes face backwards and the airstream though the engine bay is going to go up right at that point. If you want lot's of air at ambient temperatures you'll have to suck it from in front of the bike. I've got a few ideas on how to do that (which are just ideas at the moment) and i'm going to try a couple out on my project bike.

The other problem is that the intakes are facing the rear, which causes a low pressure area in the intakes as air russhes by. This slows the intake speed. If you lose the tool tray and turn the intake top around that might help some.

Just a little ramble :)

Dave.
If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

'80-'81 GL 1100 Hybrid Vetter Interstate 90K km
1989 GL1500 58K mls

Previous bikes

1973 Suzuki GT 500
1975 BMW R60/6
1982 Suzuki GS 550
1980 GL1100 (frame went to current bike, rest parted out)
1983 GL1100 Interstate
William_86
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#62

Post by William_86 »

those carbs are sexy
gl1200 85'
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Hargrave
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#63

Post by Hargrave »

I'm damn impressed.
One question though. when you had all the jets ect in the cleaner, a couple looked very similar, if not Identical, how did you tell them apart later?

Mike
Longtime bike lover, first Goldwing, have rebuilt many Honda V4's and surfed over from friends on that board.
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octane
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#64

Post by octane »

Hi Mike.

..they are all marked with a number.
It's small, but it's there.
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#65

Post by heraldhamster »

octane wrote:This baby needs to breathe feeeeely
..cut the air-filter housing and lid back to
bare essentials:
Image
would you need to rejet the carbs if you only did the cut away air filter housing modification (I really dislike fighting the tub w/snorkel & lid out the top of my shelter) and NOT installed a free flowing exhaust??
sorta bulldogged custom 1978 GL1000 - "geekster"
full Vetter dress 1979 GL1000 - "Barge" (currently down)
1986 1200 Aspencade - "Heart of Gold" - daily rider
1990 1500 Aspencade - It's ALIVE! but very, very naked. not in a good way.
1978 for $100 - project in worx
1978 from a previous member here - taking up space
my original '79 bought in '91 - replacing engine (eventually, maybe someday)

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the carb of gl1000

#66

Post by gllimb »

hello octane !! what a grate job ! i am very happy to see thinks like this
i am from greece and now i am trying to rebild my carb
you gave me a light on my life really!
keep working on gls we wating to see more of your job
because these bikes must run for ever !!!!!!!!
gl1000 1978
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#67

Post by octane »

heraldhamster wrote: would you need to rejet the carbs if you only did the cut away air filter housing modification (I really dislike fighting the tub w/snorkel & lid out the top of my shelter) and NOT installed a free flowing exhaust??
I don't know
but I do recall others here having cut away the snorkel
so maybe they have experiences to relay.
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Re: the carb of gl1000

#68

Post by octane »

gllimb wrote:hello octane !! what a grate job !...
Thank you Gllimb!
Good luck with your carbs
and please ask I you're in doubt
about anything during your rebuild!
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#69

Post by gllimb »

thanks a lot !! i will need your help you see in my contry they dont know the gls they found it very dificult to fix it or found a problem and they ask a lot of money!!! then i wake up and became nice michanic on my bike
i run this bike about 18 years and only good memories i have.
find you and other sites and person got a hope a good hope that a will not stop ride her!! men you make me grazy!!

see you!
gl1000 1978
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Mike_in_Nebraska
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#70

Post by Mike_in_Nebraska »

I'm very much a newbie at the mechanical side, but can follow directions well. My questions are:
(1) What tools will I need to do this?
(2) Despite my (very) limited, would I be out of line in trying to do this on my own - following the great info found on Randakk's site and within this thread?

Thanks in advance!
Mike
Kearney NE
USMC (Ret.) 1977-2001
1980 Honda Goldwing GL1100 Interstate
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Roady
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#71

Post by Roady »

Mike, I am sure that you can do it. It take only standard tools and patience. Get Randakk's kit and video (or Howard's book depending on what model you have) and go for it.

It's not as hard as it sounds.
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#72

Post by Cookie »

My guess would be with Octane's info and Randak's video you would be able to do this with a Sear's tool kit and maybe a couple of things you might have to buy on the way.
I did mine without the fancy stuff but I've done a number of carbs in the past.
It would not want to be the very first mechanical job you ever did but if you are the average guy who changes his own oil and plugs it seems doable.
the nice part is you can ask questions here and folks will give you the benefit of their experience. I had a battle with the boots on installation and got some advice on techniques others had used.
The best thing is to know when to walk away from it as jobs often go better the next morning.
Enjoy life,
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Owner of 4.4 76s and one lone 75 Wings (does a spare engine make .2?)
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Whiskerfish
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#73

Post by Whiskerfish »

Mike_in_Nebraska wrote:I'm very much a newbie at the mechanical side, but can follow directions well. My questions are:
(1) What tools will I need to do this?
(2) Despite my (very) limited, would I be out of line in trying to do this on my own - following the great info found on Randakk's site and within this thread?

Thanks in advance!
For the most part there are no real special tools to do the rebuild. You will need something to measure the float height. I picked up a small carpenters square with metric measurements on it that I use and it only cost a few dollars at ACE. After the rebuild you will need to get a synch done, and that requires gages or sticks to do.

If you can follow directions and pay attention to details then you can do the job. The more "anal" you are about cleanliness and paying attention to the process the better your product will be. My first time took me about 13-14 hours. It was painful but very worth it.
"Agreement is not a requirement for Respect" CDR Michael Smith USN (Ret) 2017
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2008 GL1800 IIIA "TH3DOG"
1975/6/7/8/9 Arthur Fulmer Dressed Road bike
1975 Naked Noisy and Nasty in town bike
and a whole garage full of possibilities!!

Psst. oh and by the way CHANGE YOUR BELTS!!!!
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#74

Post by Cookie »

My square was right there and I never thought to use it. That would have been easier to see if the floats were level with.
Enjoy life,
Cookie


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Owner of 4.4 76s and one lone 75 Wings (does a spare engine make .2?)
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#75

Post by IDIDNTDOIT »

WOW!!!! I never deamed they could cram so many pieces in such a small package!!! You mention bead blasting.... I am sure everone relizes the EXTREME care that must be taken to get all the abrasives out!!!! I have found a great way to "imitate" a comercial parts jet-washer, I run the parts thru my household dishwasher (note: my signature saying). It also works to clean carbon off of pistons!!!! I use zip-ties to hold small parts to the pegs for glasses and a closable mesh basket or mesh bag for really small parts. Make sure you have already degreased them to your best ability to start with. THANKS again for all the info, I would never have tried to pull my carbs myself without it.
It is easier to seek forgiveness than ask permission!!

'77 gl1000
another parts bike gl1000
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