'82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

A forum for stories, pics and updates of your resto's. Be it a barn find, Grampas hand me down or a bike being brought back to it's former glory.If you are restoring it, show us your stuff!

Moderators: Brant, Sagebrush, Forum Moderators

Post Reply
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#31

Post by GW Hobo »

raiddrten wrote:Yes, the weather sure took a turn here as well after a very mild November and December. I have a wood floor shop, but built a hasty wall floor to ceiling and about 8x10 floor area. There are two glass patio doors framed large enough to bring bikes or at least parts of them inside to work on. A small heater takes the edge off. I should show this stuff over on my project, i suppose.

But I just want to congratulate you on getting your bike to run. I have to do my water pump and timing belts before the radiator even goes on. Then the carb kit. It iS a really big deal to hear that engine run the first time [at least mine will fire the pistons] and a lot of people give up because it takes planning, work, and discipline
Thanks - I'd be lying if I said I never play that video now and again. More than a few bike builders have said I was off for taking on a non-running bike as the basis for a refurbish/build. And even now, I'm still worried that my stator charges my battery and my clutch is fully functional.

Given this, I'd be interested in thoughts moving forward. Plan A - tank back on and functional, new rear tire, rebuild/refurbish rear brakes, put rear end back together, swap out fork on front end, get it road worthy....basically continue on with my build in hopes that with all this work, such things like the clutch, stator, etc. are all ok and its worth my time to build this bike right...OR

Plan B, put everything back on the bike (rusty tank, 20 year old tires which hold air, and all), use an aux tank flowing directly to the engine, check the front brakes to make sure at least THEY work (don't worry about backs), and see if I can take it out for a test run of some sort.

Plan B was suggested this week by a bike builder who was concerned that even though the motor runs, too many other things could be wrong with the bike that you would'nt know until you can test ride it. So before putting any more real money into it, he suggested I get it test-drive worthy to see if the clutch works, the stator charges, etc.

I'm into this bike for about $1,000 ($500 purchase and another $500 parts/materials) and my budget was $3,000 total to get it like I want it (figured it would take me 2+ years). Honestly, it's been fun just jacking with it and knowing from the pics on this website that it can be unique some day.

Radar - send me pics of your bike-man-cave. Any space like that where you can crack a beer, put on tunes, and turn some wrenches year round sounds great to me. I imagine there's already a thread on here somewhere for rooms/garages/spaces like that too. Add a small bar, some Jameson and Spotted Cow in a kegerator, coupla bar stools, a flat screen, outdoor speakers, and a crappy sofa so my friends and I can sit around and talk about nonsense - sounds like heaven. (A urinal'd be nice.)
raiddrten
Billet Alum. Member
Billet Alum. Member
Posts: 218
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:14 pm

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#32

Post by raiddrten »

I usually clean out my own tanks and the Gl1000 was no exception. A lot of what we assume is rust is not rust at all but crystal dried gasoline. Buy some Pine Sol 100 ounce bottle for about seven dollars and pour it in your removed tank. If you see a lot of gunk flake off, then you have dried "varnish from old gas. With the tank removed, lay it out and shim it up until the tank is 100% full. buy enough pine sol to make a +or- 30% solution. Soak it for a few days and then pour out and save the pine sol. Use plenty of hot water and agitation and just keep shaking that tank until you get the loose stuff out.

The next step is to use large diameter steel rounds with a mushroom head or a big washer welded near the top so you can hang them right down in the fuel tank connect them together with electrical clips and then to a battery charger. Gold wing tanks are a snap because of the sensor hole and the filler hole. To insulate the steel rounds from the tank, i just used an old section of inner tube. The pine sol will probably work fine as a carrier for the electrical current, but if not, a cup of washing soda will make it work faster.

Tiny foaming bubbles will come out of the tank. When the reaction stops in a few hours, dump the tank and save the solution. Scrape and wash the rust and dirt from the steel rounds and again rinse the tank with each reaction. Then dip the settled solution back into the tank for round two. I try to not get any settled dirt from the recovered pine sol back into the tank because the dirt slows down the reaction. Remember to keep that tank 100% full so the reaction takes the rust from the roof of the tank.

Once the tank is clean, you need to avoid flash rusting. i stuff a towel into the tank to quickly absorb the water after rinsing several times. immediately follow that with about a cup of gasoline shaken in the tank and then repeat. follow that up with a third cup of gas and oil mixed half and half.

Oh, and i vote for running that bike as soon as you can with a test tank maybe from a lawn tractor before spending lots more money on it. As long as it has new timing belts installed

Here is where to find out about the process https://www.google.com/search?client=fi ... 106QKoyjVo
Just remember that the bigger the electrode you use,and the cleaner you keep the electrode and liquid, The faster things will happen. I started out early one morning, and a very dirty tank was done 24 hours later.
raiddrten
Billet Alum. Member
Billet Alum. Member
Posts: 218
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:14 pm

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#33

Post by raiddrten »

I should have included that you need to watch your speed on those old tires and realize that they are dangerous because old hard tires have compromised traction as well as a possibility of tire failure. I had a sudden flat at 65 MPH in the rain and have no idea how that bike stayed up.
User avatar
Track T 2411
Honored Life Member
Honored Life Member
Posts: 7880
Joined: Thu May 29, 2008 9:37 pm
My Album: http://www.ngwclub.com/gallery/v/wingmans/Track+T+2411/
Location: Prairie du Sac Wisconsin

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#34

Post by Track T 2411 »

In my humble opinion, I wouldn't worry about the clutch and stator too much, with only 22k on the clock. There are a few simple tests you can perform to check out the stator, as well as checking the three yellow wire connection just in front of the battery. As far as the clutch goes, Wings are not known to have many clutch problems. Just saying...
"I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious." - Albert Einstein

"He that is good with a hammer tends to think everything is a nail" - Abraham Maslow

"If you can't take the time to do it right the first time, how are you ever going to find the time to do it over?" -Unknown

Current Rides:
'Grumpy' - '81 Standard, now fully dressed.
'Layla' - '81 Standard w/dealer installed fairing and Hondaline bags.
'Scarlett' '76 'Survivor' nekkid as a j-bird!

Under Construction:
The 'Jalopy' '78-'79 Mash-up
'Quikie' '81 gl1100I back on the lift, project with the step-son!

In The Shed:
'81 gl1100I barn find aka "Josie, the farmer's daughter." (almost comatose build)
'77 gl1000, roller parts bike.
'82 gl1100I, 'Old Crusty' titled roller parts bike (free!)
'82 gl1100I, My first 'Wing, and an expensive lesson!
New2U Bike? Read Me.
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#35

Post by GW Hobo »

Thanks raiddrten and Track T - appreciate the input from you both.
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#36

Post by GW Hobo »

After some elbow grease and chemicals, I decided to abandon my gas tank. The inside tubes were rusted through and the tank was just too far gone. To fix it I'd have been working for $2.00 an hour with the amount of energy needed to get it back to functional and then it would still need some fabrication.

I went to a bike shop and asked about any leads on old GL1100 tanks. The owner had a local guy who repairs vintage bikes out of his garage and he had one for $125. More than I'd hoped but I have a clean tank and can see the shiny metal inside with the exception of a few light rust spots. After all the time I spent on the carbs, I just couldn't be sure I'd get that old tank right again and not be flushing sewage into my clean carbs, filter or not.

Moving onto the fork swap now. Thank ja for Cognito Moto - their custom fork stems aren't cheap but I can't fabricate that on my own. Hats off to those of you all that can do that work with the lathe, etc. I'd trade whiskey for some welding lessons too.
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#37

Post by GW Hobo »

While its been a minute since an update, I haven't been completely idle. While waiting for Midwest weather to turn hospitable again, a 30 day training vacation with America's Navy, and a bike budget wish list that keeps growing, I researched fork swaps (thanks John, KMR, Hanslehoff, wingrider, Batwing and 82aspy). There were a number of front ends/forks that would have worked for me rake and trail-wise, but between my budget and their availability, some were beyond reach. The '98-'02 Yamaha R1 model years had a longer fork and were still USD, so they were one of my options. And thanks to Ed's Parts Warehouse (if you're in the Chicago area); Ed deals in a lot of Yamaha sport bikes so I had him keep an eye out for a 2001 R1. He found me a $200, 2001 R1, almost full front end. While off a low miles bike, the bike was totaled and salvaged because it was "spray painted" black after it was stolen from the prior owner and spray painted by the thief to hide the bike. So I've got some work to do to get the forks clean. But I can remove the paint with a fingernail so the anodized aluminum should shine up. Here's some pictures - sorry for the sidewayz pics - the wheel and a brand new tire aren't pictured. Meanwhile, I got the bike started again last weekend before I tear apart the wiring. This is the summer that it either turns into a bike, or a paperweight. Again, thanks to a lot of folks on this site and others who took the time to talk about their fork swaps - I learned a ton.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
Hanslehoff
Titanium Member
Titanium Member
Posts: 363
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 12:30 pm
Location: Canada

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#38

Post by Hanslehoff »

Nice find on the R1 front end! I’m almost ready to get mine on the road after 6 months of off and on planning and building. You’ve got some work ahead of you this summer but will be well worth it. Looking forward to following your progress
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#39

Post by GW Hobo »

Fork #1 came clean - 1000 grit sandpaper, some dish soap, elbow grease, and some persuasion from a dull putty knife. My buddy reminded me that the lower portion of the lower half of the forks was likely silver and pics from the era confirmed, so that paint needs to come off. I might add that to my powder coating list but strip it myself. I like it better as black.

From the pics with the electrical...well there's no turning back now. I undid the whole harness to see what went where. I'm thinking of going with the motogadget m-unit. Revival Cycles, Austin, TX sells motogadget accessories and they have several Tech Talk YouTube videos that have been super helpful. Once I got a good sense for what was going where, I started to take out wires that didn't either make the engine go or charge the battery. So I'm getting down to the basic wiring first on the existing harness. It's not nearly as complicated as it looked. The wiring was made more complex than the original GL1100 Standard diagram because someone did a so-so job splicing in the Fairing wiring which was Hondaline. But even then, getting down to what went where was straightforward with the GL1100 Standard original wiring diagram. I'd like to keep all the same sensors, so I'm looking for a good speedo.

Next step is to continue with the forks, getting them clean. I sent off the lower triple to get the new stem pressed in, then I'd like to mock up the bike on the new forks and get the stance right. Per a buddy's suggestion, I'll probably take a couple 2x4s and drill holes for the various shock lengths that I might use to see how the back tire sits on the fender. I'd like to come down at least an inch. Also need to consider a bigger tire for the front wheel and whether I want to use the R1 wheel or add another project with making the GL1100 wheel work. Any input would be appreciated on that one though I've received some great input from many of you on your fork swaps already - thanks for that.

I was reminded that the brakes are supposed to be blue on the pistons. I'm afraid to use stripper on anything but I saw a new set in a couple towns over for $74 so maybe I'll take a chance. Would love to 'meet' the guy who spray painted this bike.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
wingrider
SUPER BIKER!!!!
SUPER BIKER!!!!
Posts: 3351
Joined: Thu May 24, 2012 12:15 pm
Location: St. Michael, MN USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#40

Post by wingrider »

Those forks should clean up nice! Will be interesting to see how it sits with the new front end!
2002 1800 Wing
2001 Valkyrie Interstate
1978 1200 EFI Wing with Motorvation Coupe Royale sidecar
1977 1200 Wing cafe/bobber project
1974 Suzuki GT550
User avatar
BikeMaine
Gold Member
Gold Member
Posts: 1099
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2016 7:57 pm
Location: Maine, U.S.A.

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#41

Post by BikeMaine »

Looking forward to following your thread.
Mine is also an '82.
Kevin
1982 GL1100A
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#42

Post by GW Hobo »

Finally got the forks cleaned off. Elbow grease mostly. I used stripper on the fork feet that were peeling anyway and were factory aluminum.

I had the new steering stem pressed in on the R1 lower and stripped the lower. I just dropped it off at the welder to have the stops grinded off and a new stop welded on. I'll plan on using the old Honda hood/stop on the factory neck tube.

I do plan on borrowing a grinder to take of that upper-neck/hook/thingy (see last pic). Don't know that I will have a use for that on the new set up but I can't recall what it was doing when I took down the front end. Was it for the weight for the fairing?

I know there's a ton of info on tires here at NGW so I'll check them again, but I put the rear tire back on in anticipation of getting the front end on and getting the stance right. Avon sells a 120/90-17" which will work well for the front R1 tire. On the rear, has anyone made a 150/90-16 work? Seems like there's room (barely) with about 10-12mm on each side at the closest point.

Bottomline, even if I go with a stock tire on back, this should put my fork drop just under 2" if my numbers are correct, which will mirror closely the new 11" shocks in the back.

Best laid plans, I know, but this could be cool.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
Hanslehoff
Titanium Member
Titanium Member
Posts: 363
Joined: Tue May 06, 2014 12:30 pm
Location: Canada

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#43

Post by Hanslehoff »

The tab on the headstock is for the steering lock. I also had to grind mine off in order to clear the top triple when I swapped my front end. Forks cleaned up awesome, coming along great!
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#44

Post by GW Hobo »

New rear tire came in the mail today. Thanks to Rocky Mountain MC - going with Avons. I picked up new Yamaha brake parts to rebuild the front brakes, and I dropped off the covers, timing belt covers, triple tree, and some other parts for powder coating. All ballz kit came as well so next job is to get the front end on and get the stance right. I'd like to be wiring the bike by July. I've got more work to do than I can handle but things are coming along.

Final thought - I have an excel spreadsheet that summarizes much of my fork length analysis across several bikes. I tried to put in accurate info where I could find it and often referenced the url of the location the info was found. Much of it is rehashed across the net but it might be a starting point for anyone else doing a build someday. Maybe Brant or Sagebrush can let me know if its ok to post the link - or you can PM me and I'm glad to pass it on.
GW Hobo
Cast Iron Member
Cast Iron Member
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:57 am
Location: Hilton Head Island, SC, USA

Re: '82 Cafe Racer Build - GL1100 born naked and will be again

#45

Post by GW Hobo »

Just rebuilt the front Yamaha R1 brakes and the Honda rear. Pretty straightforward stuff after some instruction from the Yamaha dealer and youtube. Gaskets aren't cheap, but the pistons cleaned up great and I'm ready to mount them back on. Yamahas were sintered brakes so I went with sintered in back with Honda too instead of organic. Noisier, I read, but better quality and better in wet-weather. Curious if anyone has a take on that.

Still waiting on parts back from powdercoating but here's a mockup shot before I broke it down. That's the original tire on the front - just bought a bigger one that I'll mount this week.

I wanted to get the front end back on for good by July 1 but that may be delayed by powdercoating. Still dreading buying the wiring harness and m-unit but it'll be worth the price once the wiring begins. Might have to sell off one of the kids...jk. Sorta. (teenagers...you get it).
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Post Reply

Return to “Members Restorations and Projects”